Monthly Archives: April 2014

Women are gold diggers: part two

In my opinion, men are right when they say women are gold-diggers; but only to some extent. This said, I feel they make a grave mistake when they assume all women are gold-diggers. It’s extremely offensive when an honest woman is treated as one; as a gold digger.

Last month my sister was trying to find a company where she could intern. A friend of hers, who works in a bank, helped her secure a position in one of their branches. When my sister told him she had gotten the internship, he light-heartedly told her she owed him a few drinks.

Friday, that same week, he called her in the morning before she left for school asking her out later in the evening. They had never gone out before as he was engaged when they first met and was going to tie the knot in a few weeks; however he and his fiancée split up last year. Thrilled, my sister agreed to it, thinking he wanted to take her out as it was her birthday.”

When my sister came back home, she wouldn’t stop complaining how unchivalrous the guy had been. Apparently they had gone to two clubs and in both places she had paid for all their drinks.

“I know he had said I owed him a few drinks for helping me get the internship,” she complained, looking visibly disappointed, “but he asked me out. And this was our first time out together. He should at least have offered to go dutch.”

I tried pacifying her, even though I found myself lost for words. I was of the same opinion, that since he asked her out he should have paid for the drinks. I reasoned, if she had asked him out it would have been okay for her to foot the bill, but he asked her out; plus that was their first time out together.

Sometimes I like to think of myself as a little traditional. Maybe I’m wrong; but first impressions really matter. I have no issue paying bills or going dutch with a guy, just not on the first date. And if I do it, I would love to be the one who offers to pay half or all of it, and not because I was pushed to it.

“I’m never going out with him again,” she vowed. “He let me pay the bill, and he knew it was my birthday.”

I couldn’t blame her for her decision. If I was in her situation I wouldn’t either.

While they were talking about him getting her an internship, he told her teaching was his first love. Even though he worked in a bank, he worked part-time as a lecturer and would love to get a permanent teaching job. She asked him to apply for a job in the university she goes to.

After their night out, they rarely talk. Yesterday he sent her a copy of the CV he had sent to her school applying for a position as a lecturer. In the CV he had indicated how much he makes per month at the bank. He could be the next multi-millionaire in town for all I know; if he’s not one already. After getting over my shock, I started wondering why he would bother to send her a copy of his CV when there’s nothing she could do to help him get the job, as much as she wanted to return the favour. I just assumed he wanted to impress her with the money; anyone could be lured by that enormous figure. Maybe I was wrong.

He could be a generous guy, but the thought that he let my sister pay for their drinks on their first ‘date’ and on her birthday, had me thinking he’s just stingy. He had the chance to make a good first impression, but he blew it. In my opinion he broke at least all rules of dating etiquette. My sister already vowed to never go out with him, simply because she deduced he was ungallant; tight-fisted. If ever she went out with him again in future, it wouldn’t be for his charm but solely for the money.

Luckily for him, my sisters and I know in life there are things that are far more important than money. It may sound hypocritical to some, but truth is money is not everything. I know of guys who earn meagre wages but never miss the chance to treat a woman like a lady. Not all women are money-minded; chasing men only for their wealth. All they hope to get from a man are the small gestures, like him pulling out a sit for her, paying the bill-even if it’s only on the first date…

In short, not all women are gold diggers. In the process of trying to impress a woman with his wealth, a man could actually end up losing her because if she’s not after the money, that will be a real deal-breaker.

Women are gold diggers: part one

Women are gold diggers. That’s what many men seem to think nowadays. Are they right? Or it’s just a ploy to make women come off as unbelievably materialistic

Wikipedia defines gold digger as: slang for a greedy person (stereotypically a woman) who only dates (and subsequently marries) wealthy partners with the (typically) sole intention of exploiting said wealth. The term is usually pejorative.

I have this cousin, who I’d only seen once when I was five and never met again until I was a teenager; I wrote about our encounter in Belinda. When I first laid my eyes on her, she seemed to have a very soft demeanour, and was quite shy; she had trouble looking someone straight in the eyes. From what I gathered, that was her first time in the city as she and her family lived in a farm in the countryside.

When they visited, she was accompanied by her mom and elder brother; it was just a normal courtesy call. Two days later, when her mom and brother left for their home she was left behind. Her mom-my aunt-wanted mom to have her enrolled in a school as she had dropped out for lack of funds. Mom had refused because at the time we were also having some money issues; my aunt therefore, requested mom to find her a job then.

We knew it would be difficult to get her a decent job since she didn’t have papers; nonetheless, mom said she would try. Seven months down the line, mom hadn’t managed to find her a job. Afraid that my cousin would take more time before she found a job, mom called my aunt and suggested that my cousin go back home. Eventually she did.

During her stay with us, I realized she was somewhat introverted. At first I thought she was still feeling nervous around us-my sisters and I-since we were practically strangers but as weeks passed by, she didn’t seem to loosen up. If we were doing karaoke we would ask her to join in but she would diffidently refuse; she didn’t have the guts to stand in front of us. We would playfully drag her off the seat to come sing with us but she would giggle, covering her face with her hands. She really was shy.

As months passed by, it occurred to me, she wasn’t the demure lass we had all assumed her to be. For instance, she could actually sing. Once, I was walking to the kitchen when I heard her singing in the living room to Celine Dion’s songs. I treaded softly to the living room and found her singing blithely; she didn’t seem to have a care in the world.

“So you can sing?” I said, shocked and impressed at the same time.

She swung around swiftly, clearly stunned to find me standing there. Assuming her timid self, she plonked herself in the nearest couch. I thought maybe she was afraid of me or something, so I told her, “No, carry on. You really have a beautiful voice.” I made sure my voice came out soft, in case she was scared. She didn’t sing again that day though.

Weeks later, my big sister bumped into my ex. He wanted to see me, so she invited him over for lunch the next day. When my sister told me we would be having a guest I gave my cousin a brief explanation about who he was so she wouldn’t feel out of place when he came.

The following day my ex came, accompanied by one of his friends, who was also an acquaintance. My sister and I prepared the food and later set the table. When the four of us were sitted, my cousin showed up, dressed in a revealing top and fitting pants, and her face completely made up. Again, I was shocked, yet impressed at the same time.

Shocked, because she had actually done her own make up given that I was always the one who was doing it as she didn’t seem to know how and had never shown the interest to learn; and impressed because she had made the effort to look nice. She was a girl of many surprises. Those innocent acts convinced me she wasn’t as coy. I got the impression she had so much concealed beneath her introverted façade.

When she left, we didn’t keep in touch. I only heard she had found a job in the city. After that I only saw her once. Her mom had visited and she came to see her at our place. The next time I saw her was at grams’ funeral last October. She showed up with a very cute guy, who after much prodding, she introduced only as a friend. I had a few questions to ask about ‘her friend’ but I wasn’t in the mood for it.

This past Monday, mom called her mom to check up on her. While they were talking mom asked about my cousin. Turns out she’s looking for a rich man to marry. Mom asked my aunt about the ‘friend’ my cousin was with. My aunt just said my cousin didn’t want him because he wasn’t loaded.

Mom didn’t know what to reply to that. She only told my aunt, “Just tell her not to get anyone’s husband.”

So, if women are gold-diggers? Based on my cousin’s choice of men, I can’t refute the claims.

Of sainthood and beyism

canonization of popes

Yesterday one of the most memorable events in history took place. Two living popes: Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and the incumbent Pope Francis celebrated the canonization mass of two of their predecessors, Popes John XXIII and John Paul II as they were declared saints. Pope Francis said the two men had led exemplary lives during the 20th century.

In his own words, the two Popes, now saints, were priests, bishops and popes of the 20th century. They lived through the tragic events of that century but they were not overwhelmed by them. The event held at the St. Peter’s Square was witnessed by hundreds of thousands of pilgrims from all walks of life. “For them, God was more powerful,” he said.

I wouldn’t really know much about their particular reigns, as I wasn’t born yet when Pope John XXIII was in office and for the better part of the papal reign of John Paul II I was still small; however, the things I heard about the latter gave me the impression he was very holy. I always had the impression that the world would end the day he died. I feared my worst fears would be confirmed when he died in 2005, but other than the unique burial, everything was just normal.

I remember watching him on TV; he carried himself with so much grace and everything about him screamed ‘holy’. I don’t laugh at myself for thinking he was God incarnate. Pope John XXIII on the other hand is credited for helping bring to end official catholic prejudice against Jews and his pacifying role during the cold war, among other things.

This grand, historic event reminded me of a reflection in my prayer book:

Why were the saints, saints?

Because they were:

Cheerful, when it was difficult to be cheerful;

Patient, when it was difficult to be patient; they pushed on when they wanted to stand still;

Kept silence, when they wanted to talk;

Were agreeable, when they wanted to be disagreeable.

That was all; it was quite simple, and always will be.

Is being a saint really that easy? As much as I try to walk in the footsteps of Christ, I find trouble trying to be happy when I should be pissed; remaining silent when someone needs to get a piece of my mind… My honest opinion is, it’s not easy being a saint.

The canonization of the two pontiffs had me thinking about Beyoncé being viewed as a deity by some of her fans. I don’t mean to compare her to the pontiffs or Jesus, for that matter; I’m just trying to find sense in a rather bizarre issue. Has the singer lived such an exemplary life as to be called a god?

beyism

I’m assuming everyone has heard of Mother Teresa of Calcutta? As noble as she was, serving people selflessly, she was never regarded a deity. She was only considered a humble servant of God; and instead of calling her goddess, we pray for her. I’m not too sure I know all that’s involved in the process of beatifying someone but one thing I’m sure of is that there’s intense praying involved.

And Mandela? Remember him? The man who fought for South Africa’s independence and became the country’s first black president in 1994? He was loved by many. When he died last year, the whole world mourned the loss of a great hero. Leaders from all over the world sent their condolences and many of them attended his funeral.

While he was still alive, he wasn’t oblivious to the fact that people adored him. But, to all those who thought he was a saint, he said, “I am not a saint. Unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying.” I thought that was so noble of him; nowadays humans die to get titles, most of which they haven’t earned.

Beyoncé, for instance; she has done a great job as an artist, but does that qualify her to be called ‘the almighty?” Great men like Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela and other people who have played remarkable roles in the making of history were never regarded as deities. They lived for others, even died for them, but haven’t been called gods.

It’s from this that I find the whole idea of beyism (Beyoncé-ism) totally irrelevant, and discernibly iniquitous. The basic characteristics of a leader are:

-One must be intellectual.

– One must be prepared to suffer.

-One must know how to forgive those who wrong them.

These celebrities we adore so much; can any one of them die for their fans? Would Beyoncé suffer even for those who now call her goddess? I’m just thinking people have weird ways of showing their love for their idols. Toby Sheldon is one of these crazy fans. He has spent over $100,000 in attempt to look like his idol, Justin Bieber.

justin beiber look-alike

I don’t mind people going out of their way to show their love, problem is how they do it. I only hope someone sane out there will help drive some sense into all those who claim Beyoncé is their goddess; those, who now profess beyism.

 

 

2nd Sunday of Easter

Today is the second Sunday of Easter; and with it we conclude the Octave of Easter.

On this day we celebrate the Divine Mercy: Years ago, in the 1930s, Jesus appeared to Sister Faustina Kowalska and promised her that He would bestow His Divine Mercy on any sinner, who would repent his sins, no matter how grave they were. He promised He wouldn’t refuse any soul that would seek His mercy. He also asked Sister Faustina, on numerous occasions, that a feast day be dedicated to celebrate the Divine Mercy and that this day be celebrated on the Sunday after Easter.

Jesus the Divine Mercy

On 30th April, 2000 when Pope John Paul II canonized Sister Faustina, he said, “It’s important that we accept the whole message that comes to us from the word of God on this second Sunday of Easter, which from now on throughout the church, will be called Divine Mercy Sunday’.”

On this day-today-people are asked to reflect on their lives and repent whatever wrongs they have committed, no matter how big. Based on this, the day is also known as the feast of the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

Today, being the eighth day (one week) since Easter Sunday, Christians are called to reflect on the mysteries of Easter; how Christ’s death and resurrection has impacted our lives:

Why Sunday; genesis of Sunday as the day of worship

After His resurrection, Jesus made His first appearance on Easter Sunday, when He appeared to Mary Magdalene and later His disciples. Thomas, also known as ‘the twin’ wasn’t with them at the time. When the rest of the disciples told him Jesus had appeared to them he refused to believe.

Eight days later, when the disciples were gathered in a closed room, afraid of the Jewish authorities, Jesus appeared to them. This time Thomas was with them. Jesus asked him to feel the scars on His hands and on His side. It’s only after that experience that Thomas believed He truly was the risen Christ. (John 20: 11-28).

On both occasions, Jesus appeared to His disciples on the first day of the week; which on the current calendar is translated as a Sunday. Before His death and resurrection, the Sabbath-Saturday-was observed as the holy day. That’s why the authorities faulted Jesus for healing people on the Sabbath; which was against the law as the commandments handed down to Moses said to keep the Sabbath day holy.

After He resurrected, the first day of the week-Sunday-was interpreted to be the day of meeting with the Lord. And from then, Sunday is celebrated as the Holy day.

Faith as communitarian; importance of going to church

We’re told Thomas wasn’t in the room the first time Jesus appeared to His disciples. One would wonder, “Where was he?” In the bible it’s not mentioned where he was at the time. Again, one would imagine the state he was in after learning of Jesus’ resurrection. Excitement and fear maybe? Chances are he was out there trying to confirm if there was any truth to the rumours being circulated about Jesus’ resurrection.

Wherever he was, he didn’t see Jesus. That’s why he had a difficult time believing the other disciples. Alone, he didn’t find the resurrected Christ. It was only when he was together with the other disciples, gathered behind locked doors that Jesus appeared again.

From this we see that when it comes to matters faith, one might not find Christ on a lone journey; but it’s evidently clear that where people are gathered in prayer, the Lord is ever present. Due to this, people are encouraged to pray as a community; as a church.

Blessed are those who have not seen me and yet believe

Jesus told Thomas, “You have believed me because you have seen me. Happy are those who haven’t seen me and yet believe.”

A Christian’s life is all about believing the unseen; believing in a God we have never seen. We’re told faith is a gift. This is simply because one can’t buy it from a mall etc. It’s something that should be felt; something we receive from God’s Holy Spirit. Like the air we breathe; we don’t see it, but we know it’s there. It’s the same with God. Should we refuse to believe He exists just because we have never seen His face? Only the Son knows how His Father looks like. But should that stop us from believing?

In John 8: 55, Jesus told the Pharisees, “You have never known Him, but I know Him. If I were to say I do not know Him, I would be a liar like you. But I do know Him, and I obey His word.”

We believe in God the Father, because we believe in the God the Son.

Thomas is a symbol of all those who doubt Christ. It’s okay to have doubts because it’s only by trying to clear the doubts that we find answers, which in turn strengthen our faith. However, in this day and age, God doesn’t make ‘dramatic’ appearances like He used to in the olden days. For the Christians of today, we believe because of the experiences written in the bible. If one waits to believe when they actually see God, the day might never come, so they’ll die without believing.

From my own experiences though, I can say confidently; God is always there with us. We only have to let ourselves feel His presence in our lives. Call Him today; He will answer. And if He doesn’t come immediately, don’t lose hope. Jesus took eight days to appear; to prove His resurrection to doubting Thomas. It’s all about Faith and Hope. That is what Easter gives us.

 

 

Church of Bey (Beyoncé) ???

Last night I had a difficult time picking my jaw up after it hit the floor so hard. I was watching this magazine show when I saw, what in my opinion, is the mother of all ludicrousness. Turns out, Mrs Carter, popularly known as Beyoncé, now has a church in her name. The national church of Bey -based in Atlanta- as they call it wasn’t just named in honour of the music icon, but worships her as their ‘Almighty’. To them apparently, Beyoncé Knowles is a deity. Symbols of the church are Beyonce’s images.

church of bey

First time I saw Beyoncé was when she was the lead singer of destiny’s child. Every girl my age loved their music, their outfits…everything about them. Later on she went solo and fans loved her songs even more. I can’t deny she has a beautiful voice and her songs are amazing and therefore clearly comprehend the whole notion of fans falling in love with her, dying to get her autographs, spending hard-earned money to attend her live concerts…but for me that’s where it ends; all the admiration etc.

In my opinion, this whole church idea is just ludicrous. It’s okay to idolize her; but forming a church in her honour and branding her ‘the almighty’ is just crossing the blurred line between sanity and insanity. Honestly, isn’t that blasphemy?

The Oxford dictionary defines the term ‘church’ as a building where Christians go to worship. With this definition I would term the name ‘church of Bey’ utterly inappropriate. They should coin another term for their place of worship. But worshipping Beyonce? Really People? I get the whole idea of wanting to have something/someone to believe in; but the musician is as human as you and me are. When did she become a deity?

The only thing that makes her special than the average human being is that she could possibly buy a country and still not dent her bank accounts. That means money is all that makes her special; money she’s gotten from her fans. I’m just wondering, if something went horribly wrong and she was declared bankrupt, would she still be revered as’ the almighty?’

Out of sheer curiosity, does Beyoncé know of the said church? Assuming she does, what is her opinion on the matter?

It just feels wrong that people have turned to worshipping their fellow human beings. Unless I’m missing something here, Beyoncé wields no mystical powers. She couldn’t heal a sick person or anything that required a miracle. The best she could do is offer financial aid to someone in need.

It is absolutely true, Beyoncé is a super talented musician, and she deserves our love and admiration; she has earned it, in every sense of the word; however, terming her as almighty, feels so wrong. That is love blown out of all epic proportions. I’m imagining, years from now, having the ‘church of Bey’ widespread, with faithful, devoutly serving their goddess, mother Bey, and the ‘beyble’ as their holy book…I’m not so sure what everyone feels about this, but to me, it’s wrong.

beyble

In the book of Revelations, we are told of end times and false prophets…with the way things are going, I feel we are fast-forwarding things…

 

 

Sometimes it’s hard being a woman

obsessed with being perfect

An article I was reading had me thinking a lot about some men’s contradictory nature appertaining to women’s beauty. The writer-a man-was talking about things that men find attractive in women. As I read the article, I couldn’t help shaking my head in disagreement. He reminded me of the uncountable instances I’ve heard men slamming women who have undergone reconstructive surgery to alter some parts of their bodies, just so they can look the part.

‘Fake eye lashes, fake boobs, fake bum, fake nose, fake hair and she wants a real man’, is a phrase I’ve read so many times, posted by guys on social media. Still, these same men want the picture-perfect woman; a woman who has ‘everything in the right place’. I find it amusing;  moreover, these same men will complain when their ‘model-ish’ women order salads when they go out on dates; apparently, the calorie-counting thing doesn’t sit so well with them.

men's ideal woman

The writer of the said article pointed out some things that I-in all honesty-found utterly ridiculous. According to him, men like a woman who-in his own words- is not too short; someone they won’t have to kneel to kiss but one who isn’t a goliath still. To that I beg to ask, what can a woman do to alter their God-given height, other than wear, ‘kill-a-man-heels’ if they are too short or ballet flats if they are so tall? Think, Marissa Cooper from O.C. portrayed by Mischa Barton. One doesn’t choose to be tall/short.

He asked, “Who wants sleepy/tired boobs?” Do I need to repeat what everyone ought to know? That boobs, come in different shapes and sizes. They could be melons, or little gum drops, firm or saggy… they’re boobs regardless. And if they are natural, at some point gravity will take its toll on them.

In my opinion, it’s okay to have preferences, but I couldn’t help sympathizing with the women who read that article and felt like they were being victimized. Didn’t the writer know it’s comments like those that deflate someone’s self-esteem majorly? Men like him say they want their women’s boobs and booty big and firm; yet they still condemn plastic surgery and other temporary enhancers like hip/bum enhancers?

On body size, the writer quoted a guy who said he would want a woman whose figure would make him go gaga. I’m imagining visible love handles wouldn’t be in the mix then? We live in an era where eating disorders like bulimia and anorexia nervosa have become so prevalent. What would keep such disorders at bay if this is how we judge beauty? It might be easy to pass judgment on anyone suffering from any of them, but importantly, one should look at what triggered it.

He didn’t leave out matters complexion. Apparently, many men, even the dark ones prefer light-skinned women. So, where does that leave the beautiful dark women? It is no wonder, nowadays bleaching cosmetics are so rife in the market; a large majority of dark-skinned women are attempting to lighten their skins. Who would blame them if in men’s eyes light is prettier? Still, the same men criticize them for ‘bleaching’… Seriously? It’s a no brainer that at least every woman likes to feel desirable and as it is, not many are confident about their looks. Whatever the case, it doesn’t change the fact that black is beautiful.

And the, oh- so- flawless skin! According to that writer, pimples are a turn off. I can’t blame him he feels that. My only problem is, if that’s the case, why do they still complain when a woman piles on layers of make-up, in an attempt to hide those undesirable flaws?

I almost forgot the infamous wigs/weaves/hair extensions. If I got paid everytime I heard a guy lamenting how he hated these hair extensions, I would probably be featured on Forbes, topping the list of billionaires. If you ask me, it is hypocritical that these said men claim they hate weaves, yet they will be falling over themselves, drooling over Asian beauties because they have natural, long, sleek, flowing hair. It goes without saying that under this circumstances, if a woman’s hair is short she’ll opt for ‘fake hair’ which is obviously long.

men's perspective on beauty

I have absolutely no qualms with guys having their own preferences; I also know what I particularly like in men. My only problem is, they say unreservedly what they find attractive, yet criticize women who go out of their way to ‘meet those high demands’. With such shifting goal posts, I would say it’s hard being a woman sometimes. I particularly empathize with the women who feel victimized by such hollow preferences; women who try to look the part, yet end up feeling condemned by the same people who pushed them to take whatever measures.

Based on these fluctuating preferences, I would suggest that any woman who feels compelled to do anything to modify their looks should do it, not for any man, but for their own personal satisfaction; for their own happiness.

 

 

 

Spiritual blindness: Part 2

Saul’s conversion is another biblical incident where physical blindness is attributed to spiritual blindness: As Saul was coming near the city of Damascus, suddenly a light from the sky flashed around him. He fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?”

“Who are you, Lord?” He asked.

“I am Jesus, whom you persecute,” the voice said. “But get up and go into the city, where you will be told what you must do.”

The men who were travelling with Saul had stopped, not saying a word; they heard the voice but couldn’t see anyone. Saul got up from the ground and opened his eyes, but could not see a thing. So they took him by the hand and led him into Damascus. For three days he was not able to see, and during that time he could not eat or drink anything.

There was a Christian in Damascus called Ananias. He had a vision, in which the Lord said to him to go place his hands on Saul so that he might see again. So Ananias went, entered the house where Saul was and placed his hands on him. “Brother Saul,” he said. The Lord has sent me-Jesus himself who appeared to you on the road as you were coming here. He sent me so that you might see again and be filled with the Holy Spirit.”

At once something like fish scales fell from Saul’s eyes, and he was able to see again. He stood up and was baptized; and after he had eaten his strength came back. After his conversion he went on to spread the word of God. In the company of Barnabas, he went to the island of Cyprus, having been sent by the Holy Spirit.

They went all the way across the island to Paphos, where they met a certain magician named Ber-Jesus, a Jew who claimed to be a prophet. He was a friend of the governor of the island, Sergius Paulus, who was an intelligent man. The governor called Barnabas and Saul before him because he wanted to hear the word of God. But they were opposed by the magician Elymas (that is his name in Greek), who tried to turn the governor away from the faith.

Then Saul-also known as Paul-was filled with the Holy Spirit; he looked straight at the magician and said, “You son of the devil! You are the enemy of everything that is good. You are full of all kinds of tricks, and you always keep trying to turn the Lord’s truths into lies! The Lord’s hand will come down on you and you will be blind and you will not see the light of day for a time.

At once Elymas felt a dark mist cover his eyes, and he walked around trying to find someone to lead him by the hand. When the governor saw what had happened, he believed; for he was greatly amazed at the teaching about the Lord. (Acts 13: 4-12).

In both incidences, Saul and Elymas lost their physical sight because they were spiritually blind. In the bible we are told of people who lost their sight because they did not believe in God so the only cure was to believe in Him; like Saul did. In life however, blindness is a condition attributed to other causes and not necessarily sin.

It is so with us. We may be able to see with our eyes, but when it comes to matters faith we fail to see what God intends for us to see. Only He can restore our spiritual sight. That, we can achieve by seeking His help and trying to do what He expects of us, and by learning to see Him in every little incident; in the things that bring us joy, even sadness. To believe that everything that happens to us happens because He allows it, for a greater purpose; a reason our finite minds may not be able to comprehend.

spiritual blindness

In everything we do we should involve God in our plans. That means we shouldn’t cling on to our plans; we should leave room for Him to surprise us, because sometimes the plans we make are different from what He has in store for us. By entrusting our lives to Him, we do away with things that lead us into darkness, e.g. anxiety and disappointment which comes from failure to achieve set goals.

Seek the Lord